Sharing Art

A common problem many artists have who have been creating for a long time is what to do with the products of their labors.  We may exhibit at art shows, a gallery or in places such as restaurants, theatres, offices, etc.  For most of us this results in occasional sales while the rest of our output simply accumulates.  Eventually storage becomes a problem.

Many people simply don’t think about acquiring original art.  It may seem too expensive.  They decorate their walls with posters, reproductions and décor purchased at a local hobby store.  A question we as artists have to think about is, should original art belong only to the well-to-do or highly educated?  Some artists say yes, that giving away original art or selling it at greatly reduced prices reduces the chance for artists to make a living at what they do (which is really not a possibility for most of us.)

I don’t agree.  I would like my art to find a home with someone who appreciates it, regardless of their financial status.  I keep records and I think I have given away as much as I’ve sold.  Some have gone to charity auctions.  Many others have gone to individuals, some as appreciation, and others to recognize special occasions.  Recently two of my paintings found homes, one to a newly married couple, and the one above as a graduation and engagement present.

When I am giving to individuals, I like to let them choose.  I have numerous paintings on the walls in my basement and it is fun for me to watch them try to decide which one they will choose and why they like it, sometimes for reasons that would never occur to me, such as the high school graduate a year ago who chose a painting of a Norwegian Fjord because it reminded him of Narnia.  The one above was chosen by an aspiring filmmaker because, he said, he liked the light and shadows, which was what he tried to capture on film.

So I’ll keep on painting and giving but selling one occasionally would be nice too.

Still Arting

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Sunflower Bouquet, acrylic, 16″ x 12″

This past week I participated in the Art is Ageless show at the Presbyterian Manor in Lawrence.  This art show is an annual event and anyone who is a senior citizen can enter, not just residents of the Manor.  There are a number of categories including needlework, such as quilts or embroidery.  The categories for paintings are either amateur or professional.  But all professional means is that you occasionally sell your work.  This year I won a second place ribbon for the above painting.  The person writing their newsletter interviewed me before this show because I had won a best of show ribbon last year.

As a senior citizen this was a good show for me to enter because it was near where I lived and only required me to deliver two paintings.  Best of all, although I could have entered by computer, I didn’t have to.  I could just hand in a form filled out by hand when I delivered my paintings.  They didn’t even charge an entry fee.  Of course there was no prize money either, which may be whey there are not very many entries, although I’m sure Lawrence must have many senior artists.

Often artists keep making art long after the age of 65.  In fact some take it up in retirement.  The Artist magazine also recognizes this with an annual contest for senior artists.  A problem for senior artists is not so much the making of art but showing it.  The time when I could lug many paintings to an outdoor show that might last a couple days, find help to put up a tent, and sit out there in all kinds of weather is past.  I now only do one outdoor show, Art in the Park in Lawrence, which does not involve long travel and only last a half a day.  Also, this show still allows people to enter by submitting photographs.

A major difficulty for senior citizen artists is entering art shows.  They almost all require computers not only for the form and to pay the fee but also to submit images of one’s art work.  Some seniors don’t even have computers.  Others, like me, have them but only use them for a few simple things.  I haven’t found the help categories on my computer very helpful.  Sometimes my husband can figure it out.  My son who knows the most about computers lives too far away.

If you are planning an art show in your community, also make it friendly to older artists.   Let people enter either by computer or by snail mail with photographs and a check.  If the show, either indoors or out, is the kind where each individual brings a number of paintings, maybe have a few younger people available to help those who are less able.  As we share what we are creating we may also encourage others to keep on keeping on.

A Young Artist

I don’t know who she is but I know she is a teenager who shares my love of art. At Christmastime a church group I belong to gets the name of a family who needs gifts at Christmas. Then each member of our group takes one of the names and buys something from their wish list. We’ve done this for a number of years. Sometimes the requests have been for sizes of clothing I can’t easily find or a child will ask for some toy I’ve never heard of and don’t know where to buy it. But this year was different.

A teenaged girl asked for art supplies and canvases and I knew right away that was the person I wanted to shop for. For a low income person wanting to paint, the expense can be daunting. The two high schools in our town have very good art programs so I assumed the girl I was buying for had already been introduced to some basic concepts and wanted to do more. (If she is already enrolled in art classes she was ahead of where I was at that age. My high school offered no art at all.)

I never go shopping on Black Friday but this year I made an exception. Both Hobby Lobby and Michaels had bargains too good to pass up. When my package is delivered she will have a nice surprise. I wish I could know what she will do with it. I discovered art in college and although it has not been a way to earn a living it has enhanced my life considerably over many years. I hope it will do the same for her.

Never Give Up

Last year was not a good year for me artistically.  There were less places locally to exhibit paintings than there used to be.  And no one seemed to be interested in my work.  I signed up for Art Walk in October, when people visit local artists at their homes or studios.  In addition to the numerous paintings on the walls of my basement gallery, I put out a stack of older work I wanted to get rid of at greatly reduced prices.  The only painting I sold all year was one from that stack.

It made me wonder what was the point in painting if all I was doing was piling up art nobody wanted.  But for some of us not being creative does not seem to be an option.  We are simply programmed to be artists.  We can’t help it.  The same seems to be true of writers and musicians.  So I gave a few paintings as gifts and kept on creating.

Then came more bad luck.  My computer stopped working and went away for repairs for almost a month.  Computers are vital to just about everyone these days, including artists.  I couldn’t add photos of new paintings to those already on the computer or print them.  The records of my work were on my computer.  And I couldn’t write on my blog or enter art shows that these days have to be done on a computer.  When my computer finally returned I found a new Microsoft system on it and even more frustrating a whole new picture system, Adobe Elements 14, that is probably a good system if I could understand how it works.

But then suddenly things began to change for the better.  My daughter referred a woman to me who wanted a painting of a dog, now deceased, that had been her husband’s favorite.  She provided a photo.  I hadn’t done a dog in years but I rashly said yes and agreed to do it in pastels, a medium I don’t usually work in.  The result is below.  (I wanted to put it above but somehow couldn’t.)  The woman was pleased with the portrait of “Benny,” which was to be a gift for her husband.

Several more sales followed.  I participated in Art in the Park and sold a painting of a Bradford pear tree.  I joined the plein air painters at the Overland Park Arboretum spring event and sold a painting from it.  A relative bought a painting to give as a gift.  So I guess I’ll just keep on keeping on.  The process itself is irresistable.

 

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Seizing the Moment

Here in Lawrence, Kansas, spring arrived early this year.  All of a sudden the landscape was bursting with color, especially the trees.  While it was still late March the Bradford pear trees turned white with blossoms.  The redbuds and flowering crab apple trees soon followed.  Now the neighborhoods are also filled with lilacs and the young cherry tree in my back yard is covered with blooms.  What an inspiration for a painter.

But these very colorful sights are also very fleeting.  A tree that is in full bloom one day may in a spring storm send petals to the ground.  If you want to capture some of this beauty with paint you’d better not put it off.  Coming out of exercise class one morning I noticed a row of blooming Bradford pear trees across the street.  But I was in a hurry and didn’t stop to photograph them. Passing that way in the afternoon I did stop but somehow the scene was not the same.  The light was coming from a different direction and that made a difference.  Fortunately, I had enough sense to go back the next morning and photograph them and I have started a painting.

But actually painting on site is so much better.  When I was driving out in the country to paint at an artist friend’s house, I noticed her blooming Brandford pear tree long before I reached the house and that’s what I decided to paint chosing an 18″ x 14″ canvas with wide enough stretchers not to need a frame.  I was faced with a very windy day.  But I was determined not to waste this opportunity.  So I painted in my car, even though the car I have now is very small.  And I will remember the beauty of springtime whenever I look at that painting.

So when you see one of these glorious sights of spring, seize the moment.  Take a photo if you must or better yet don’t put off setting up your easel outside.  This is one of the best times of year to paint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Artist’s Life

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Threads, 12″ x 12″, acrylic

A new year has begun and after the holidays it’s time to get back painting and all the activities that go along with it.  When people think of the life of an artist they think of the actual act of creating art.  But there is so much more to it than that.

There are many related activities one must make time for and often pay for as well and this includes a lot more than just shopping for the materials.  Most artists belong to some kind of organized group of those with similar interests.  I belong to both the Topeka Art Guild and the Lawrence Art Guild and dues to both are due at the beginning of the year.  The Lawrence Art Guild recently reorganized after having only sporadic activity for the past year or so.  The Topeka Art Guild has a gallery where members may show their work for a fee and also six hours of work in the gallery per month.  Their shows change every two months and I enter all of them.  Later in February I’ve been asked to demonstrate plein air painting to one of their classes.

I’m always looking for places to show my work and the free places are now fewer and harder to come by.  So I enter a few other shows as well, which means paying a fee whether my paintings are chosen for the show or not.  I did get one painting, “Hay Bales,” accepted into the Rice Gallery in Overland Park’s upcoming plein air show, which meant an out of town drive to deliver that painting. I received a rejection from the Heartland show.  I have information about the Images show which I have gotten in before, so I will probably enter that.  If I get in, it will mean another out of town drive in city traffic to deliver a painting.

A frustration for me is the amount of computer knowledge an artist needs these days.  This year Art in the Park in Lawrence could only be entered on line.  I could fill out the form but transferring the images of the paintings required husband’s help as well as paying on line.  Why not simply allow photographs and checks?  Even writing this blog becomes more difficult as the way it is set up changes from time to time with no notification and directions.

The painting above is one I have done during weekly meetings of a small group of artists who work on their various projects.  “Threads” was painted at the home of a fiber artist.  Her sewing machine door opened to display the above colorful threads.  It seemed like a good idea for a still life.  In spite of the expense and frustrations I intend to keep on expressing myself artistically as long as possible.  Like many creative people, I can’t help it.

 

 

 

 

 

Art and the Holidays

Dec. 31, 2015

While I’ve been too busy to paint during the holidays, art continues to be a part of my life.  And I’ve been learning about a new form that may or may not be something I would consider art.  We had a big gathering of relatives here to celebrate Christmas with lots of presents under the tree.  Among those were crayons, magic markers and paper for a three year old and a big set of art supplies and sketchbooks for an 11 year old.  Both these gifts were requested by their moms and I think it’s great when parents want to encourage creativity in their children.

But then I listened to what several adult women had to say about a new activity for adults, adult coloring books.  One had received a book as a gift and had tried it and enjoyed it.  Another, who has done some creative art, is buying the books for herself as a form of relaxation after a day on the job.  A young woman who works at a senior care facility said a woman of very advanced age who lived in the facility spent many happy hours with such books.

I don’t know what to make of this.  It is true that these books are nothing like the coloring books children used to use.  The adult version features intricate abstract designs that are filled in with colored pencils.  Is this a creative activity?  I suppose some would say so.  I’m not against people following patterns.  Women who sew, quilt, knit or crochet have been doing that for many years and create attractive, creative and useful items.  But what does one do with a completed page in a coloring book?  Another thought.  While both men and women pursue various forms of the arts, I can’t imagine a man using an adult coloring book.  But I’ll try to keep an open mind even though I won’t be buying one for myself.

 

Symbols of Autumn

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Still life with Hedge Apples, acrylic, 18″ x 14″.

What do you think of when you think of autumn? As a painter I have tended to think of the beautiful colors of the trees as they turn from green to yellow, gold, orange and red. I have painted them many times. Since rural areas are not far from where I live I have also painted pumpkins, cornstalks, and soybean fields at this time of year. But a problem with living in the same area for a long time and also being a painter during those years is that it can become difficult to find subjects for painting that I have not done many times before.

Last month I was at a friend’s house where I had often painted before. The weather was just too good to paint inside and I would rather look at what I am painting than paint from a photograph. I went out on the deck to look at the view, which wasn’t particularly inspiring, but on a table sat a pot of yellow mums along with some green hedge apples. I don’t remember seeing hedge apples before I moved to Kansas. When my kids were young they used to pick some up in the neighborhood and bring them home. I liked the looks of those bumpy green balls and would set them in a bowl on the table.

But I don’t remember ever seeing a painting featuring hedge apples. I like to paint with a palette knife and both the mums and the texture of the hedge apples seemed to lend themselves to that kind of painting so I set up my easel on the deck and got busy. As painters we need to be especially aware of our surroundings. Who knows when the next unlikely object will strike our fancy. Hedge apples and mums, at least here in Kansas, will remind me of the beauty of autumn.

PAINTING IN A CROWD

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Grinter Sunflowers, acrylic, 16″ x 12″

I have been painting at the Grinter sunflower field for some years now as the mother of the man who plants these gorgeous fields is an artist friend of mine. The sunflower field is located between Lawrence and Tonganoxie, Kansas. On Sept. 2 I drove out there to paint. I loaded my painting gear and me, not an easy task at my age, onto a flat bed parked near the field. The day was cloudy and there was no one around. The sunflowers were at their peak. I began to draw in a few lines on my canvas and then the rain began. I sat in the car for a while hopeing it would stop but it didn’t.

On Wednesday Sept. 9 I returned and what a difference. The sun was shining, the weather was not too hot and there were people everywhere. The grassy area across from the filed was filled with cars. Three other artists that I know of were painting, mothers wandered about with their children too young to be in school. Everyone seemed to have a camera, some fancier than others.

Ordinarily, I don’t like to paint in a crowd, but some of the sunflowers already looked a bit raggedy. If I wanted to paint it had to be today. Up onto the flat bed went me and my gear. I had a great view. I could see an artist with a white umbrella who was actually sitting in the field. Across the road where the cars were parked another artist had lifted his trunk lid to provide a bit of shade and was busily at work.

Soon I was too while the people continued to arrive and depart and snap their pictures. Several even thought I looked picturesque and asked to take photos of me. Overall everyone was polite and good natured. They asked if I minded before they perched their little ones on the flat bed and with flattery or promises of bribes tried to coax them into looking cute. In spite of all the activity I am pleased with my painting pictured above. And I got to meet two women artists from the Kansas City area at lunchtime.

The Lawrence Journal-World wrote that thousands had visited that field this year from across the United States and the world. (It’s a good thing I didn’t come on a weekend.) The paper credited social media, especially Grinter Farms Facebook page, for the field’s increased popularity.

What Does it Mean?

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“It’s a Jungle Out There,” acrylic, 18″ x 14″

Have you ever looked at an abstract painting and wondered what the artist was thinking when it was painted?  It is sometimes hard to tell.  Often there is just a vague general title with a number after it, which makes me think the artist has as much trouble as I usually do thinking of names for my creations.  But the painting above is an exception.  I knew immediately what I would call it.

This painting came about from both a sketch and a photo taken on our recent trip to New Zealand.  I was sitting in the visitors’ center at Mount Egmont on the North Island.  The day was cold and overcast.  The students in our group were hiking part way up the mountain.  Hiking any distance uphill does not appeal to me any more so I sat inside at a table drinking a mochachino and waiting.  When I looked up at the window I was amazed.  The temperature outside must have been about 40 degrees–it’s winter in New Zealand in May–but here was brightly colored tropical foliage.

I took out my sketching supplies, which included colored pencils.  I also took a photo with husband’s camera.  When we returned from New Zealand the first painting I did from my sketches was the one pictured above.  I knew right away what I would call it, “It’s a Jungle Out There.”  If you watched the TV series about a detective named Monk, you might remember that phrase from the program’s theme song.  Mr. Monk was a man who was afraid of many things.  To him the world around him was a scary place.  In my painting the woodlike frame is painted as part of the composition to show that the jungle is “out there.”  But in my painting “out there” is not scary.  With its bright colors and interesting shapes it calls us to come out and explore.  Who knows what we might find?